Putnam Co. farmer honored for service

PUTNAM COUNTY – Local farmer and agriculture leader, Perry Bartlett, was recently recognized by the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation with the highest honor Farm Bureau gives a volunteer leader. At the 2017 Farm Bureau Convention held in Franklin, Tenn., Mr. Bartlett was recognized as one of five distinguished leaders in the state of Tennessee. This honor is given annually to farm leaders across the state who demonstrate both a commitment to the agricultural industry and service in the communities in which they live.

“Our organization wouldn’t be what it is today without the leadership, direction and countless hours of dedication that come from volunteer leaders like Perry,” said Putnam County Farm Bureau President Sam Tays. “His service to Farm Bureau has spanned more than 50 years and he truly believes in giving back both to the agriculture industry and serving his local community.”

Bartlett still lives on the land where he was raised and learned all about farm life. He and his wife Nell married in 1959 and they had two boys they raised on the farm and now enjoy their four grandchildren. Bartlett raises beef cattle, tobacco, row crops and operated a dairy for 20 years. In addition to his extensive farming operation, he also has given a tremendous amount of time serving his community.

For more than 20 years Bartlett served as a volunteer fireman in the Dry Valley community. He has been actively involved in the Putnam County Livestock Association, Cumberland Beef Breeders Association and for 18 years he has served on the Putnam County Election Commission. Bartlett was an advisory director on the Cookeville Federal Land Bank, has served on the Farm Service Agency county committee, and was the manager of the Putnam County Fair for 14 years.

He has also been recognized as the Jaycees and Kiwanis Club farmer of the year and for his outstanding conservation efforts through the Soil Conservation District. Bartlett longest serving volunteer position is a member of the board of directors of the Putnam County Farm Bureau. At the heart of his service has been his commitment to local Farm Bureau. Bartlett was first elected to the board of directors of the Putnam County Farm Bureau in 1966 and is still a valuable and active member today.

Farm Bureau serves over ten thousand families in Putnam County through four offices, and promotes agriculture through its education and advocacy efforts, as well as providing services to members of the farm and nonfarm community through the Farm Bureau group of companies. To find out more about Farm Bureau, visit any of the local offices or online at www.tnfarmbureau.org.

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